New York Songlines: 61st Street

West End | Amsterdam | Columbus | Broadway | Central Park W | 5th Ave | Madison | Park | Lexington | 3rd Ave | 2nd Ave | 1st Ave | York




HUDSON RIVER

Riverside Park South, New York City by Emilio Santacoloma, on Flickr It was called the Muhhekunnetuk by the Mahicans, meaning the River That Flows Both Ways--a reference to its formal status as an estuary or fjord, a glacier-carved branch of the sea with salt water as high as Newburgh and tides all the way up to Troy. Originally known by the Dutch as the North River--as opposed to the South River, now called the Delaware--its current name honors Henry Hudson, the English explorer who sailed up it in 1609. He's also the namesake of Hudson Bay, where mutinous crewmen left him to his presumed death in 1611.



Riverside Park South

This new green space on the Hudson was created on part of the site of New York Central's 60th Street Rail Yard, which stretched from 59th to 72nd streets, serving as a transfer facility for rail cars brought across the river by ferry--Manhattan then as now being unequipped with a rail bridge or tunnel that can handle freight traffic. After New York Central became Penn Central, it was known as the Penn Yards; with the collapse of the rail industry, it was abandoned in 1976. Riverside Park South, Memorial Day weekend 2010 - 10 by Ed Yourdon, on Flickr

As early as 1962, there was talk about turning it into a real-estate development--originally in partnership with the Amalgamated Lithographers Union, to be called Litho City. Developer Abe Hirschfield was involved with a plan for the yards called Lincoln West that fell through in the early '80s. Donald Trump took over the project in 1985 with a plan called Television City (later Trump City), which would include studio space for NBC and a 152-story tower designed by Helmut Jahn.

Facing strong community resistance and financial troubles, Trump adopted an alternative scaled-back proposal called Riverside South that added 23 acres of green space to Riverside Park--creating an annex called Riverside Park South.


S <===     WESTSIDE HIGHWAY     ===> N

Officially renamed the Joe DiMaggio highway by baseball-obsessed Mayor Giuliani. Between 1929 and 1951, an elevated highway was built here; it was closed in 1973 for safety reasons and finally torn down in 1989.


S <===     RIVERSIDE BLVD     ===> N

South:

400 (block): Two Waterline Square, a 38-story project designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox, scheduled to be completed in 2019. In the age of climate change, I wouldn't think you'd want to put "waterline" into the name of your development, but I'm sure they focus-grouped it. Architectural Digest called the complex it's part of "New York's fastest-selling development."







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Corner (50 Riverside): One Riverside Park, a 33-story development that came under fire for including a "poor door" to segregate subsidized tenants.

The Collegiate School

Corner (301 Freedom Place South): This private boys' prep school claims to be the oldest school in the United States, tracing its origins back to 1628 efforts by the Dutch Reformed Church to catechize Native American children. Alumni include Peter Bogdanovich, David Duchovny, John F. Kennedy Jr., Bill Kristol, Cesar Romero, Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. and Whit Stillman.


S <===     FREEDOM PLACE SOUTH     ===> N

South:

Block (21 West End): 21 West End Apartments, 43 stories designed by SCLE Architects and opened in 2016.







300 (corner): PS 191/Riverside School for Makers and Artists moved to the new building here in 2017. Also home to the Museum Magnet School.

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Block (33 West End): A 25-story apartment building, completed 2007 to a Costas Kondylis design.









Corner (33 West End): West End Wine & Spirits is in the southeast corner of the development.


S <===     WEST END AVENUE     ===> N

South:

Abraham Joshua Heschel School

Corner (20 West End): Jewish day school named for rabbi and civil rights advocate Abraham Joshua Heschel.
2002, West End Ave.

238: Hudson Animal Hospital

232: Tooth Works pediatric dentist

226: Empire State Driving School










210 (corner): The William O'Shea Complex houses the Anderson School, a highly competitive public K-8 school, as well as the Computer School and PS 452.

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Amsterdam Houses

1947, Amsterdam Ave.

249 (corner): One of 13 public housing buildings, opened in 1948, are home to some 2,300 people. Actor Erik Estrada grew up in these projects.

West End Secondary School

227: A public middle and high school with an interdisciplinary focus. The building used to house Beacon High School before it moved to Hell's Kitchen.

211: A 1927 building that houses the American Musical & Dramatic Academy and the Gateway School, a private K-8 school for students with language-based learning disabilities and attention deficits. From 1989 through 2004, this was the home of the Alvin Ailey Dance Theater, the pioneering multicultural modern dance company.

Corner (40 Amsterdam): More Amsterdam Houses.


S <===     AMSTERDAM AVENUE     ===> N

South:

Corner: McMahon Hall, a 20-story Fordham University dorm. Education, Social Service & Business






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161 (corner): The Alfred Apartments, a 36-story tower from 1987. Gordon Gecko lives here in the Wall Street sequel.






Fordham University

A Jesuit university founded in 1841, it's the third-oldest college in New York City, after Columbia and NYU. Originally called St. John's University, it took its current name in 1907 after the village of Fordham where its orginal campus was and is still located. The Lincoln Center campus opened in 1961 as part of the Lincoln Square Renewal Project.

Famous alumni include Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his journalist brother Christopher; vice presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro; CIA directors William Casey and John Brennan; Watergate felons G. Gordon Liddy and John Mitchell; actors Alan Alda, Denzel Washington and Raul Julia; magician David Copperfield; football coach Vince Lombardi; and musician Lana del Rey.

Lowenstein Building

Fordham College at Lincoln Center Reunion

The main building of Fordham College at Lincoln Center, it houses the College of Liberal Studies and the graduate schools of Education, Social Service and Business Administration.

Robert Moses Plaza

Fordham College at Lincoln Center Reunion

Moses, one of New York City's great builders and destroyers, was instrumental in the Lincoln Square redevelopment that created this campus. His legacy is controversial, though-- in this instance because of his open disdain for the Puerto Rican neighborhoods he displaced--as indicated by the fact that a statue of Moses has been installed and removed from this green space more than once.

Fordham Law School

DSC05717

Robert F. Kennedy spoke at the dedication of the law school here in 1961.


S <===     COLUMBUS AVENUE     ===> N

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30: The Beaumont, a 31-story condo tower built in 1982.

24: Arsenal West, the headquarters of the Manhattan Department of Parks & Recreation--so called because these offices began as overflow from the Parks Department's hq at the Arsenal in Central Park.
New York Institute of Technology

New York Institute of Technology

Corner (1855 Broadway): A college founded in 1955 to focus on technology and applied science; this is one of its two main campuses, the other being at Old Westbury on Long Island.

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Martino Hall

43-45 (corner): Built in 1929 as the Kent Automatic Parking Garage, a 24-story "Hotel for Autos" that could store and retrieve more than a thousand cars without human intervention. Designed by Jardine, Hill & Murdock in an Art Deco, Aztec-esque style.

In 1943 it became a warehouse for Sofia Brothers moving and storage; in 1985, it was converted into the Sofia Apartments, where the College Board had its headquarters. In 2015, it was acquired by Fordham, which renamed it for Joseph Martino, chair of the National Lead Company and vice chair of Port Authority, who as a university trustee was instrumental in the move to Lincoln Square.

Corner (1865 Broadway): A 33-story building completed in 2018 to a Skidmore, Owings & Merrill design. It replaced another building by the same firm, the 1966 American Bible Society Building. The American Bible Society was founded in New York City in 1816; John Jay was among its first presidents, and Francis Scott Key a long-time vice president. It sold its headquarters and moved to Philadelphia amidst financial difficulties in 2015. The Museum of Biblical Art was located in the ABS's building.


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Corner: There's a triangular public space here associated with the hotel. The two-headed sculpture is The Duo (1997) by David L. Hostetler.

Trump International Hotel

Trump International Hotel & Tower, NYC by faungg, on Flickr

Block (1 CPW): Built in 1970 as the Gulf + Western Building--and home to Paramount Communications, as Gulf + Western rebranded itself-- Donald Trump took it over in 1994, converting it from an office building to a hotel/condo tower. It's 44 stories tall, though Trump claimed it had 52. Janet Jackson was one of his tenants. The building was featured in the 2011 crime comedy Tower Heist.













Corner: German Expressionist painter Max Beckmann died of a heart attack on this corner, December 26, 1950.

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Corner (1860 Broadway): Was a 17-story Emory Roth building from 1927. Demolished 1986.

15 Central Park West

15 Central Park West

Block (15 CPW): A 2008 building designed by Robert Stern to look pre-war, it immediately became one of the most prestigious addresses in New York City and a template for high-end development. Residents include Robert De Niro, Sting, Norman Lear, Denzel Washington, Bob Costas and Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein.

Formerly on the site was the Mayflower Hotel, which opened in 1926, designed by Emory Roth. Baseball legend Joe DiMaggio lived here on and off during his first four seasons with the Yankees (1936-39), during which the team won the World Series four times. He kept a suite here after the death of his ex-wife, Marilyn Monroe.

The Mayflower was also home to Felix the Cat creator Pat Sullivan and flea circus impressario Max Schaffer. The Bolshoi Ballet was staying here in August 1979 when its star dancer, Alexander Godunov, defected to the United States. Jack Nicholson lived there in the movie Wolf

On this spot on September 27, 1898, Vincent Youmans was born, who wrote the music for "I Want to Be Happy" and "Tea for Two."


S <===     CENTRAL PARK WEST     ===> N

Central Park

Central Park, New York by  Mathew Knott, on Flickr

Arguably the greatest work of art in all of human history. I have been known to make that argument, anyway.

An 853-acre expanse of green in the middle of Manhattan, it's the most-visited public park in the world, with 25 million visitors annually. Responding to calls from civic leaders like William Cullen Bryant, the city acquired the land in 1853 and held a design contest in 1857, choosing the Greensward Plan of Frederick Law Olmstead and Calvert Vaux (rhymes with "Walks"). After the moving of 3 million tons of earth and the planting of 270,000 trees and shrubs, the park--almost entirely landscaped, despite its naturalistic appearance--opened to visitors in 1859 (though not officially completed until 1873).





Central Park - Manhattan, New York

Greyshot Arch

One of the Calvert Vaux's first arch designs, built in 1860. Provides a passageway under the West Drive.

In the movie Cloverfield, the last survivors take shelter here. It's implied that their video camera survives the destruction of Manhattan because it's sheltered by the arch-- allowing for the "found footage" to be found.



S <===     WEST DRIVE     ===> N


























Central Park-Heckscher Playground, 11.02.13

Pinebank Arch

Pinebank Arch | Central Park Central Park originally had seven cast-iron bridges; this is one of the five that remain.

Heckscher Playground

The oldest and largest playground in the park, it was designated as "Play-Ground" in the orginal Greensward plan--meaning some ground you could play on. In 1927 it was turned into a proper playground, and named by parks commissioner August Heckscher after his grandfather, conveniently also named August Heckscher. The playground underwent a major modernization in 2005--it's cool!

The expansion of the playground destroyed Spur Rock Arch, one of Calvert Vaux's original cast-iron bridges.


S <===     CENTER DRIVE     ===> N

Cop Cot

A rustic wooden shelter (of sorts--it lacks an actual roof). Not intended as a place for police to sleep, its name means "Hilltop Cottage" in Old English.

Hallett Nature Sanctuary

An area of the park where people are kept out for the sake of wildlife.



Central Park-Cop Cot, 11.30.13


Central Park foliage photo-walk, Nov 2009 - 09 by Ed Yourdon, on Flickr The Pond by ET calls home, on Flickr

The Pond

Olmstead and Vaux set this lovely and tranquil artificial lake below street level so as to immediately bring visitors out of the city into a more pastoral experience. It's also one of the most beautiful views into the park from outside. The ducks that Holden Caulfield worries about in Catcher in the Rye are swimming in The Pond.










Overlook Rock Rock Climbers


S <===     EAST DRIVE     ===> N

Wein Walk

Portrait of a Girl The path from Grand Army Plaza to the Zoo is inhabited by many sketch artists and a few puppeteers or balloon animal makers. There used to be more masseuses.

It's named for Lawrence Wien, a real estate lawyer who once owned the Empire State Building and the Plaza Hotel. He gave millions of dollars to Central Park and other nonprofit causes, particularly Columbia University.


S <===     FIFTH AVENUE     ===> N

South:

Hotel Pierre

NYC - UES: Hotel Pierre by wallyg, on Flickr

2 (corner): One of New York City's most elegant hotels, built in 1929 by restaurateur Charles Pierre, (whose restaurant had just been replaced by the New York Central Building), with the backing of E.F. Hutton, Walter Chrysler and others. Architects Schultze and Weaver based the 41-story tower's design in part on the Royal Chapel at Versailles. Launched as the Great Depression was beginning, the venture was bankrupt by 1932; the hotel was bought by J. Paul Getty in 1938 for $2.5 million, about one-sixth of what it cost to build.

The hotel's regular guests included Gary Cooper, Spencer Tracy, Aristotle Onassis, Jimmy Stewart, Audrey Hepburn, Tom Jones, Claire Trevor and Charles Bronson. Hotel Pierre by edenpictures, on Flickr

Woolworth's heiress Barbara Hutton had a suite, leading striking clerks to picket the hotel, chanting, "Is 18 dollars a week too much?"

John O'Hara wrote the first of his Pal Joey stories here in 1938; Dashiell Hammett began writing The Thin Man here in 1932; he checked out without paying his bill, wearing all his clothes at once. French director Rene Clair lived here after fleeing the German invasion of France.

Lucille Ball and Desi Arnez had a six-week honeymoon here in 1940. Barbara Stanwyck and Robert Taylor lived here together before their 1950 divorce. Composer Richard Rodgers spent the last years of his life here, dying in bed on December 30, 1979.

On January 2, 1972, armed robbers (reportedly associated with the Lucchese crime family) took over the hotel to rob its safety deposit boxes of as many as $10 million in jewels. Two of the crooks were soon caught; the rest got away with the bulk of the loot.

Al Pacino, Robert Redford, Lee Iacocca and George Steinbrenner were a few of the devoted customers of the hotel barber, Gio Hernandez, who died in 1989.

Joe is told to stay here rather than at the Plaza in Joe vs. the Volcano. The dance scene in Scent of a Woman was shot in the Pierre's Cotillion Ballroom. On Mad Men, the relaunched Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce ad agency temporily does business out of a suite here. The penthouse serves as the title character's apartment in the 2011 remake of Arthur.

The Pierre was built on the site of Elbridge Gerry's mansion, an 1897 French Renaissance structure designed by Richard Morris Hunt. Gerry was a lawyer and philanthropist whose grandfather was the namesake of the Gerrymander.

Barney's

NYC - Barney's 2008 Holiday Window - Peace & Love: Have a Hippie Holiday!

Corner (660 Madison): Founded in 1923 by Barney Pressman, this New York retail icon moved its flagship to the Upper East Side in 1993, where it occupies nine floors of the 22-story building. Noted for its sometimes bizarre Christmas windows; Lady Gaga was in charge of the holiday decorations in 2011. The store appears in the movie First Wives Club.

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800 Fifth Avenue by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner (800 5th Ave): This 1978 33-story apartment building was designed by Ulrich Franzen & Associates to match the height of the Knickerbocker Club with a three-story limestone screen wall facing the avenue. Singer Dolly Parton, designer Pierre Cardin, and Donald and Ivana Trump have called this home.

The building replaced the neo-Georgian townhouse of Geraldine Rockefeller Dodge, a Standard Oil heiress who married into the Phelps Dodge and Remington Arms fortunes. Torn down in 1977.

Lubin House

11: This "home base for Syracuse University's New York City operations" has to get some sort of award for most prestigious remodelings. After being built in 1876 to a plan by prolific architect (and yacht-designer) John G. Prague, it was given another floor (and an elevator) by the Woolworth Tower's C.P.H. Gilbert in 1883. After 1895, McKim Mead and White were hired to class the place up for Almeric Hugh Paget and Pauline Payne Whitney. In 1912, John Teele Pratt hired Gilbert to come back and add a sixth floor and a skylight. Delano and Aldrich came in to remodel the place in 1923, giving it its current brick facade.

The building was briefly leased to the Russian consulate after World War II, then was home to the 29 Club (the name a sardonic reference to the stock market crash) from 1947-64. It was then bought by investor Joseph Lubin for Syracuse, which turned it into an alumni house and satellite office.

15: Built in 1879 by Breen & Nason, who designed Grant's Tomb. It was home to heiress Susan Dyckman, then during World War I served as temporary housing for returning sailors. In 1919 it was bought by department store owner Henry L. Batterman, who hired Mott Schmidt--the architect of Sutton Place--to redesign it. By 1931, the place was an upscale speakeasy called Moriarty's, and later Mansion House; after repeal, it was a nightclub known as the Marlborough House.

Syracuse University purchased it in 1966, and after a protracted struggle to muscle out the rent-controlled tenants, merged it with Lubin House next door. The architects who did the unification were Swanke, Hayden and Connell, whose best-known building is Trump Tower.


























Carlton House

Corner (680 Madison): Built in 1951, this was for many years the Helmsley Carlton House, a luxury hotel. In 2010 it was bought from the estate of Leona Helmsley for conversion to luxury residences.


S <===     MADISON AVENUE     ===> N

South:

667 Madison Avenue

Corner (667 Madison): This 25-story office building by David Paul Helpern in 1987 exhibited "a decent and urbane common sense of just the sort that the New York streetscape has desperately needed," wrote the New York Times' Paul Goldberger.

36: Grand 1890s Beaux Arts; the AIA Guide notes the "elegance" of the curved glass in its bulging bay window.

38: Sotheby's International Realty

40: Model Elle MacPherson has lived here.

46: Was the home of baseball manager Leo Durocher. In 1948, after his boss, Brooklyn Dodgers president Branch Rickey angrily suggested that he should go work for the New York Giants, Durocher met with Giants owner Horace Stoneham here and did just that. Durocher's wife, actress Laraine Day, is best remembered for her role in the Hitchcock film Foreign Correspondent.









Corner (530 Park): A 19-story white-brick building by architect George F. Pelham Jr., put up in 1940. It has an intriguing facade interrupted by lines of curved windows. Bianca Jagger lived here c. 1985-2005 in a rent-stabilized apartment; after a prolonged court battle, she ended up owing $600,000 in back rent and legal fees to the landlord, who convinced the judge that this was not her primary residence.

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Corner (673 Madison: Viand, coffeeshop; Aaron Basha, jewelry

25: Teuscher Madison chocolate

33: Serafina Always, upscale Italian; was Sofia Fabulous Grill

41: Was the home of Vernon Duke, who wrote "Autumn in New York" (and the music for "April in Paris").

Loews Regency Hotel

Loews Regency Hotel by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner (540 Park): A luxury hotel that opened in 1963. Audrey Hepburn and Princess Grace have been guests here; Carol Channing was a long-term resident, as was World War I ace Eddie Rickenbacker. The 540 Park restaurant is said to have invented the "Power Breakfast" in 1975, attracting New York machers like Andrew Cuomo, Al Sharpton, David Dinkins, William Bratton and Sleeping Lion Statue @ The Loews Regency Hotel - NYC, NY by michelleCtv, on Flickr Eliot Spitzer. There's also a clubby bar called The Library; Michael Feinstein had a supper club called Feinstein's here from 1999 to 2013.

Before the hotel there was a 12-story apartment building on this site, designed by William Boring and built in 1909. It's been called "the first of the high-class apartments to be built on Park Avenue."


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Corner (525 Park): Hitchcock Center for the Environment

126: Oscar Hammerstein II lived here from 1938-43, where he wrote the lyrics for Oklahoma!.

136: Suzanne Couture Millinery






Corner (782 Lexington): Sabon, bath products

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535 Park Avenue by edenpictures, on Flickr

Corner (535 Park): A 14-story brick building with a two-story rusticated limestone base, designed by Herbert Lucas and built in 1909.


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South:

Corner (773 Lexington): Sixteen-story building from 1960.
































164: Marilyn Monroe and Tom Ewell share this brownstone in The Seven-Year Itch.

166: Art dealer Kirk Askew held a weekly salon here in the 1930s ("during 'r' months"--Literary New York") that brought together the likes of E.E. Cummings, Carl Van Vechten, Paul and Jane Bowles, Virgil Thomson, Aaron Copland, Marcel Duchamp and Salvador Dali.

170: The DOG Store, pet salon

Corner (1028 3rd Ave): Isle of Capri, Italian since 1955

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Corner (783 Lexington): Lush Spa

145: Gina Mexicana

151: A bomb went off here on June 2, 1919, at the home of Judge Charles C. Nott Jr., killing the couple who were planting it. Police believed that the target was actually Judge John Clark Knox, who presided over Red Scare trials, and that the bombers had mixed up their names. Bombs went off in four other cities at the same time, including at the house of Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer in Washington, DC; Palmer's would-be bomber also blew himself up.

Nott's claim to fame otherwise was ruling in 1922 that James Branch Cabell's novel Jurgen was not obscene because "it is doubtful if the book could be read or understood at all by more than a very limited number of readers."

Nott's father, Charles Nott Sr., was also a judge and died here on March 6, 1916. His most noteworthy ruling was denying Belva Ann Lockwood admission to the bar of the Court of Claims because she was a woman.

157: Oscar Hammerstein II moved here from 1943, when his Oklahoma! was Broadway's biggest hit. He lived here until 1948, where he wrote the lyrics for Carmen Jones and Carousel; he started work on South Pacific here.

Trump Plaza

Trump Plaza

167 (corner): A 1984 36-story co-op building developed by Donald Trump. Phyllis George, Dick Clark and Martina Navratilova were among its early residents.


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200 (corner): The Savoy, a 43-story apartment building from 1986. Donald Trump sued its developer to force a change in design, claiming it was a copy of his Trump Plaza across the intersection. Learning Express Toys on the ground floor.

Treadwell Farm Historic District

Designated in 1967, making it one of the city's first historic districts. Commemorates the former farm of Adam Treadwell, brother of Seabury Tredwell, the merchant of the Merchant's House Museum. Adam, a fur merchant, bought the farm (with a partner) in 1815; his daughter Elizabeth divided it up for development in 1854. Most of the district's brownstones were built from 1868-76 and remodeled in the 1910s-20s.

206210: Brownstones from 1873-75 by Frederick Barus mark the beginning of the historic district.

214: Manhattan Guild Trinity Baptist

250: Trinity Baptist Church was built in 1931 as the Swedish Baptist Church, serving a congregation founded in 1867 by dissenting Swedish sailors. Changed its name in 1942 to reflect anglicization. The last building in the historic district.

252 (corner): Stonehenge 61, six-story apartment building from 1940.

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201 (corner): Scalinatella, Italian

205: Marks the beginning of the historic district

209: Actor Montgomery Clift lived here from 1951-59, during the height of his career; he was nominated for Oscars while living here for A Place in the Sun and From Here to Eternity. In 1956 he had a bad car accident that contributed to his addiction to painkillers; he had a 14-foot medicine cabinet in his bathroom here. A fire broke out here in 1959, forcing him to move--a few doors down the block, as it turned out.

217: This house was given by Theodore Roosevelt as a wedding present to his daughter Alice in 1906 when she married future Speaker of the House Nicholas Longworth. (Alice was Eleanor Roosevelt's first cousin.) Critic Clifton Fadiman lived here in the 1940s; Montgomery Clift lived here from 1960 until he died of a heart attack here on July 23, 1966, at the age of 45.

223: Decanto Wines

241: Kim Novak moved out of an apartment here in September 1961; an earlier resident was Prince Aly Khan.

243: Bill Cosby lived here, where he assaulted some of his victims.

245: Walter Lippman lived here from 1929-37, the time when he launched his "Today and Tomorrow" column for the New York Herald Tribune.

249: The last building in the historic district.

Corner (1163 2nd Ave): Cozy Corner, deli


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Corner (1158 2nd Ave): Fusion Apothecary

306: Interior Design Building






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301 (corner): The Clare, 19-story post-post-modern apartment building designed by Manuel Glas; built 2017.


305: Manhattan Art Auctions

313 (corner): Little Picasso art school


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336: Renanim Preschool

Corner (1111 1st Ave): Daily Bagel

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351: Linda & Jerome Spitzer Residence, retirement home owned by the Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty

Corner (1113 1st Ave): One Lenox, Mediterranean


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Corner (401 E 60th): Bridge Tower Place; 38-story tower built in 1999, designed by Costas Kondylis.



























420 (corner): 1 Sutton Place North

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Corner (1114 1st Ave): Eight-story building from 1947. Goodwill on ground floor.

405: Casa de Costa

Mount Vernon Hotel Museum

NYC - Mount Vernon Hotel Museum and Garden

421: This period museum was originally a carriage house on a 23-acre estate called Mount Vernon; it was owned (but not lived on) by Abigail Adams Smith, daughter of John Adams, and her husband Col. William Stephens Smith, a Revolutionary War officer who was on the staff of both Lafayette and Washington, and who later tried to liberate Venezuela from Spanish colonial rule. From 1826-33 the building was the Mount Vernon Hotel, a popular resort in what was then rural Manhattan; it's that period that the museum (opened in 1939) now tries to recreate.

425: Center of Sleep Medicine; affiliated with Cornell Neurology

Corner (1275 York): Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center


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24 Sycamores Park

NYC - 24 Sycamores Playground

A block-sized playground that was cobbled together by the Parks Department in 1943. The park was named in 1985 when it was threatened with development, with Commissioner Henry Stern choosing the name to indicate that the trees had been counted and would be missed if any disappeared. Since a restoration in 1995, however, there have actually been 26 sycamores in the park.

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Corner (500 E 62nd): The Bentley Hotel, noted for its spectacular views of the East River.














Corner: The Animal Medical Center


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Andrew Haswell Green Park

This four-block-long riverfront park honors probably the most important New Yorker you may never have heard of. Green proposed uniting the five boroughs into one city in 1868, and was president of the Consolidation Inquiry Committee that finally achieved that goal in 1898.

As president of the Central Park Board of Commissioners from 1857 until 1871, he was a key voice in selecting Olmstead and Vaux's Greensward Plan and realizing the designers' vision. He also pushed for creating Riverside, Morningside and Fort Washington parks.

He helped found the New York Public Library, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the American Museum of Natural History and the Bronx and Central Park zoos. He was an early voice for historical preservation and helped save City Hall.

Despite being arguably the most influential leader in New York City's history, he's virtually unknown today; it's a sad irony that he was murdered in 1903--by a killer who mistook him for somebody else.



East River

Queensboro (59th Street) Bridge and Midtown Manhattan at Night, NYC by andrew c mace, on Flickr Roosevelt Island & UES - NYC (4-26-06) by hotdogger13, on Flickr

Not actually a river, but a tidal estuary connecting New York Harbor with Long Island Sound. Legend has it that mobster Dutch Schultz put his associate Bo Weinberg in a set of cement overshoes and dumped him in the East River--the origin of the popular stereotype.












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